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AVIVA Fort Worth Senior Resources

AVIVA Fort Worth welcomes and encourages the active participation of adult children (or other loved ones) in the process of choosing a senior living community, and throughout the life of the resident in the community. We suggest that you begin by reviewing these Frequently Asked Questions and the glossary of terms. Certainly, it’s helpful to review the various literature that’s available, but the best measure of a senior living community is to visit—to talk with the staff and experience the environment. We invite you to call for a personal tour or for additional information.

Glossary of Terms

By law, age-restricted communities require most residents to be at least 55 years old. “Age-restricted” and “active adult” commonly refer to communities that provide housing for those 55+ who live independently and do not need any healthcare services or personal assistance.

Assisted living communities typically provide services which allow the resident to maintain a degree of independence, while offering a helping hand with given tasks such as bathing, grooming, dressing, and taking medications.

CCRCs are senior living communities that provide a continuum of lifestyle options and choices, generally including independent living, assisted living, memory care, and skilled nursing residences or suites. These communities usually offer long-term contracts or written agreements, and a continuum of housing services and health care.

 

In an independent living community, residents are capable of living in a residence without assistance. Meals, housekeeping, and laundry are typically included in the rent.

Life Care is a term often used to distinguish communities that offer lifestyles and care—for life, with virtually no additional increase to monthly fees, whether a resident is in a residence or a residential health services program including assisted living, memory care or skilled nursing. By contrast, some CCRCs provide continuing care with a fee-for- service contract, requiring additional fees for living at higher levels of care.

Long-term care insurance is a type of insurance developed specifically to cover the cost of skilled nursing, assisted living, home health care and other long-term care services. These services are usually not covered by traditional health insurance or Medicare.

The federal health insurance program called Medicare is designed for people who are 65 and older, certain younger people with disabilities, and people with End-Stage Renal Disease. Medicare Parts A, B, C and D cover specific services and care.

Financed by state and federal governments, Medicaid is the program of medical assistance designed for those unable to afford regular medical service—available to fund care in a skilled nursing setting.

A specialized type of elder care, memory care is tailored specifically for the needs of individuals with Alzheimer’s, dementia, or other cognitive disorders.

Services designed to help an individual recover from an injury, operation, stroke, or illness. These may include physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy and memory care. In most cases, services are planned to help the patient return as closely as possible to pre-challenge levels. The services may be residential (inpatient), or outpatient, and may be short- or long-term, depending on the needs of the patient.

The term “retirement community” encompasses a wide scope of variations—several of which are covered here. Rental communities, continuing care, Life Care, assisted living and skilled nursing care communities all fall within the spectrum, as do age-restricted communities of individually owned homes with common services and amenities.

Skilled nursing care communities offer daily nursing care, provided or supervised by licensed medical personnel.